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Old 08-06-2013, 12:58 AM   #1
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Default The safety of tattoo ink ingredients?

Ok, so i am a very cautious person by nature. I think a lot about stuff- sometimes this works in my favor, sometimes it doesn't. But i would like a serious open discussion on this issue.

So how it started- i was reading an article on tattoo inks when i came across this;

"Red ink is the colour most commonly associated with allergic reactions. It derives from mercury metal. Black ink is most often derived from carbon, and sensitivity to carbon is rare. Yellow ink is derived from cadmium sulphide. Blue inks are created with cobalt. Green ink comes from chromium. Violet and purple inks are derived from manganese. White ink is created using either titanium or zinc oxide. If you have prior knowledge about an allergy to one of these substances, it is important to consult your doctor before getting a tattoo."

Tattoo Ink Allergies | eHow UK

Now this got my alarm bells ringing.
I'm not sure about chromium & cobalt (and i think zinc oxide is safe)but mercury & cadmium sulphide are definitely toxic substances.

"Whats in your tattoo ink?";

What's In Your Tattoo Ink?

"Non-toxic tattoo ink ingredients";

Non-toxic Tattoo Ink Ingredients | LIVESTRONG.COM

^
"Tattoos, though extremely popular, have not historically been heavily regulated. As a result, some tattoo inks have contained harmful and even toxic ingredients, ranging from metallic salts and lead to plastics, formaldehyde and a range of other chemicals. Today, many tattoo artists recognize the importance of using non-toxic inks in their work. If you want to get a tattoo, ask the artist about the ink ingredients she uses."

"Although most people getting tattoos are more concerned with the color, or pigment, another critical part of the ink is the carrier. This ingredient carries the pigment into the skin, keeping the pigment evenly mixed. Although once heavily chemical-based, today non-toxic versions of tattoo ink carriers include purified water, glycerine and ethanol, all of which How-to-Tattoo.com recommends as alternatives to toxic tattoo ink carriers. Do not overlook the importance of carrier ingredients, not just pigments, when choosing safe tattoo inks."


And some more;

"In the European Commission's report on the health risks of tattooing, they note that close to 40% of organic colorants used in permanent tattoos in Europe are not even approved for use on the skin as a cosmetic ingredient and just under 20% of the colorants studied contained a carcinogenic aromatic amine"


"Although allergic reactions to permanent tattoos are considered rare given the number of tattoos applied yearly—in the neighborhood of 5 million9—they can occur, along with scarring, phototoxic reactions (i.e., reactions from exposure to light, especially sunlight), and other adverse effects. Many people have reported reactions to the intensely colored plastic-based pigments. There are also pigments that glow in the dark or in response to black (ultraviolet) light. Some of these pigments may be safe, but others are toxic and even possibly radioactive.9 Plastic-based inks (e.g., glow-in-the-dark ink) have led to polymerization under the skin, where the tattoo pigment particles converged into one solid piece under the skin.9

Allergic reactions have occurred with some of the many metals put into tattoo inks, nickel being one of the most common metal allergies.8 Others have reacted to the mercury in red cinnabar, to cobalt blue, and to cadmium sulfite when used as a yellow pigment. Some inks were found to have high levels of lead, some contained lithium, and the blue inks were full of copper.7 Allergic reactions may occur infrequently with permanent tattoos, but the long-term health effects are still unknown due to the lack of regulation, testing, and long-term studies."



"In addition to allergic reactions and the unknown long-term health effects from the metal salts and carrier solutions that make up tattoo inks, there are other health risks involved. Skin infections, psoriasis, dermatitis and other chronic skin conditions, and tumors (both benign, and malignant) have all been associated with tattoos";

The Truth About Tattoos: Health Risks, Toxicity and More


And if you're doubtful about a website called "naturalnews" then how about from Scientific American (which is very legit);

"It is true that some red inks used for permanent tattoos contain mercury, while other reds may contain different heavy metals like cadmium or iron oxide. These metals—which give the tattoo its “permanence” in skin—have been known to cause allergic reactions, eczema and scarring and can also cause sensitivity to mercury from other sources like dental fillings or consuming some fish. While red causes the most problems, most other colors of standard tattoo ink are also derived from heavy metals (including lead, antimony, beryllium, chromium, cobalt nickel and arsenic) and can cause skin reactions in some people."

Arsenic :O ?

"Those who want go ahead with getting a tattoo anyway despite the risks should consider steering clear of colors derived from heavy metals. Dr. Kunin reports that black might be the safest permanent tattoo ink; it is often derived from a substance called carbon black and rarely causes any kind of sensitivity issues. If your heart is set on red in your tattoo, ask around to see if any tattoo parlors in your area are willing to work with non-metallic organic pigments that lend a red color such as carmine, scarlet lake, sandalwood or brazilwood. There are non-metallic alternatives available for many other popular tattoo ink shades, too."

In the Ink: Do All Tattoo Pigments Use Mercury and Other Toxic Heavy Metals?: Scientific American

More reading;

"Are Tattoos Toxic? New Research Shows Endocrine Disruptors, Metals and Carcinogens in Tattoo Ink";

Are Tattoos Toxic? New Research Shows Endocrine Disruptors, Metals and Carcinogens in Tattoo Ink | Alternet

^

"Although sleazy "scratcher shops" with unskilled artists and dubious safety records are becoming a thing of the past, scientists are growing concerned about what's going into tattooed skin, not just how it got there.

New research has turned up troubling findings about toxic chemicals in tattoo inks, including some phthalates, metals, and hydrocarbons that are carcinogens and endocrine disruptors.

Tattoo ink trouble is nothing new. The inks, which are injected into skin with small needles, have caused allergic rashes, chronic skin reactions, infection and inflammation from sun exposure, said Elizabeth Tanzi, co-director of the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery in Washington, D.C.

Now a new study published in July suggests that phthalates and other chemical ingredients may be responsible for those problems.

More concerning, these newfound chemicals raise unanswered questions about more serious, long-term risks such as skin cancer."



Etc...

So yes. I'm sure you understand where my concerns are coming from here. I'm no chemist but i know for a certain how toxic things like mercury are. I do not like the thought of it or other toxic ingredients being injected under my skin for life.

In the limited time i have been on this forum, i have read a lot of threads on bad tattoo reactions like people experiencing tattoos that are not healing properly. In pretty much all of the cases i have seen people being told that they either have an "infection" or are experiencing an "allergic reaction" and are often told that it will "settle down" etc.

But how much of these bad reactions are down to allergies or infections? How many are instead down to the fact that people are having toxic substances injected under their skin?
If i spill acid on my skin, you do not tell me that i'm having an allergic reaction to acid, you say that i am having a reaction the chemical i just spilled on my skin. If my skin fails to heal around a ball of mercury but instead dies & becomes infected, you wouldn't say that my skin is failing to heal because i wasn't hygienic and failed to look after it properly, you say that no, it is because skin will struggle to heal around a toxic metal.

Has nobody considered that perhaps an awful lot more bad tattoo reactions/tricky healing processes are down to the ingredients of what people are injecting under their skin rather than mysterious "allergic reactions" or poor hygiene?
Is anyone else here concerned about tattoo ink ingredients?
Is anybody else here concerned about the long term effects of these ingredients?
Has anyone else wondered about other health problems or strange symptoms being connected to tattoos like "Mees' lines" ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mees%27_lines ) etc?

Last edited by Tokis-Phoenix; 08-06-2013 at 01:01 AM.
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Old 08-06-2013, 01:19 AM   #2
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And for those who are still in doubt that this is a legit cause of concern, more reading;

"Tattoo Inks - What You Don't Know Could Hurt You";

Tattoo Ink Chemistry - Pigment Chemistry

(From page 2) "There are many other substances that could be found in an ink. A tattooist has the choice of mixing his or her own ink (mixing dry dispersed pigment and a carrier solution) or purchasing what are called predispersed pigments. Many predispersed pigments are as safe or safer than inks mixed by the tattooist. However, the ingredient list need not be disclosed, so any chemical could be present in the ink. The best advice is to make sure the ink supplier and the particular ink has a long history of safety. Although I have applied the word 'toxic' to many substances listed on the pigment and carrier list, that is an oversimplification. Some of these chemicals are mutagens, carcinogens, teratogens, toxins, or participate in other reactions in the body, some of which may not show up for decades."

Tattoo Ink Carrier Chemistry

"Tattoo Ink Chemistry";

Tattoo Ink Chemistry - Pigment Chemistry

"Is colored tattoo ink dangerous to your health?";

Colorful tattoo inks could be dangerous to your health - AmericaNowNews.com

"Published reports in Melanoma Research highlight studies by scientists that have researched a possible relationship between tattoos and melanomas which is a type of skin cancer.

"The majority of patients getting tattoos don't know the risks"


"Dermatologists report that red ink causes the most allergic reactions and the heavy metals in some colors could be responsible.

The brighter the yellow, purple, red and hot pink, the more potent the pigment is according to dermatologists.

They advise if you are set on getting inked, it's best to go with black. While the risk to lead remains, it is the easiest to remove. Most dermatologists agree, black ink causes fewer skin reactions."
;

Colorful tattoo inks could be dangerous to your health - AmericaNowNews.com

From the FDA's website itself;

""There have been no systematic studies of the safety of tattoo inks," says Howard, "so we are trying to ask—and answer—some fundamental questions." For example, some tattoos fade over time or fade when they are exposed to sunlight. And laser light is used to remove tattoos. "We want to know what happens to the ink," says Howard. "Where does the pigment go?""

Think Before You Ink: Are Tattoos Safe?

Etc....
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Old 08-06-2013, 01:26 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokis-Phoenix View Post
Ok, so i am a very cautious person by nature. I think a lot about stuff- sometimes this works in my favor, sometimes it doesn't. But i would like a serious open discussion on this issue.

So how it started- i was reading an article on tattoo inks when i came across this;

"Red ink is the colour most commonly associated with allergic reactions. It derives from mercury metal. Black ink is most often derived from carbon, and sensitivity to carbon is rare. Yellow ink is derived from cadmium sulphide. Blue inks are created with cobalt. Green ink comes from chromium. Violet and purple inks are derived from manganese. White ink is created using either titanium or zinc oxide. If you have prior knowledge about an allergy to one of these substances, it is important to consult your doctor before getting a tattoo."

Tattoo Ink Allergies | eHow UK

Now this got my alarm bells ringing.
I'm not sure about chromium & cobalt (and i think zinc oxide is safe)but mercury & cadmium sulphide are definitely toxic substances.

"Whats in your tattoo ink?";

What's In Your Tattoo Ink?

"Non-toxic tattoo ink ingredients";

Non-toxic Tattoo Ink Ingredients | LIVESTRONG.COM

^
"Tattoos, though extremely popular, have not historically been heavily regulated. As a result, some tattoo inks have contained harmful and even toxic ingredients, ranging from metallic salts and lead to plastics, formaldehyde and a range of other chemicals. Today, many tattoo artists recognize the importance of using non-toxic inks in their work. If you want to get a tattoo, ask the artist about the ink ingredients she uses."

"Although most people getting tattoos are more concerned with the color, or pigment, another critical part of the ink is the carrier. This ingredient carries the pigment into the skin, keeping the pigment evenly mixed. Although once heavily chemical-based, today non-toxic versions of tattoo ink carriers include purified water, glycerine and ethanol, all of which How-to-Tattoo.com recommends as alternatives to toxic tattoo ink carriers. Do not overlook the importance of carrier ingredients, not just pigments, when choosing safe tattoo inks."


And some more;

"In the European Commission's report on the health risks of tattooing, they note that close to 40% of organic colorants used in permanent tattoos in Europe are not even approved for use on the skin as a cosmetic ingredient and just under 20% of the colorants studied contained a carcinogenic aromatic amine"


"Although allergic reactions to permanent tattoos are considered rare given the number of tattoos applied yearly—in the neighborhood of 5 million9—they can occur, along with scarring, phototoxic reactions (i.e., reactions from exposure to light, especially sunlight), and other adverse effects. Many people have reported reactions to the intensely colored plastic-based pigments. There are also pigments that glow in the dark or in response to black (ultraviolet) light. Some of these pigments may be safe, but others are toxic and even possibly radioactive.9 Plastic-based inks (e.g., glow-in-the-dark ink) have led to polymerization under the skin, where the tattoo pigment particles converged into one solid piece under the skin.9

Allergic reactions have occurred with some of the many metals put into tattoo inks, nickel being one of the most common metal allergies.8 Others have reacted to the mercury in red cinnabar, to cobalt blue, and to cadmium sulfite when used as a yellow pigment. Some inks were found to have high levels of lead, some contained lithium, and the blue inks were full of copper.7 Allergic reactions may occur infrequently with permanent tattoos, but the long-term health effects are still unknown due to the lack of regulation, testing, and long-term studies."



"In addition to allergic reactions and the unknown long-term health effects from the metal salts and carrier solutions that make up tattoo inks, there are other health risks involved. Skin infections, psoriasis, dermatitis and other chronic skin conditions, and tumors (both benign, and malignant) have all been associated with tattoos";

The Truth About Tattoos: Health Risks, Toxicity and More


And if you're doubtful about a website called "naturalnews" then how about from Scientific American (which is very legit);

"It is true that some red inks used for permanent tattoos contain mercury, while other reds may contain different heavy metals like cadmium or iron oxide. These metals—which give the tattoo its “permanence” in skin—have been known to cause allergic reactions, eczema and scarring and can also cause sensitivity to mercury from other sources like dental fillings or consuming some fish. While red causes the most problems, most other colors of standard tattoo ink are also derived from heavy metals (including lead, antimony, beryllium, chromium, cobalt nickel and arsenic) and can cause skin reactions in some people."

Arsenic :O ?

"Those who want go ahead with getting a tattoo anyway despite the risks should consider steering clear of colors derived from heavy metals. Dr. Kunin reports that black might be the safest permanent tattoo ink; it is often derived from a substance called carbon black and rarely causes any kind of sensitivity issues. If your heart is set on red in your tattoo, ask around to see if any tattoo parlors in your area are willing to work with non-metallic organic pigments that lend a red color such as carmine, scarlet lake, sandalwood or brazilwood. There are non-metallic alternatives available for many other popular tattoo ink shades, too."

In the Ink: Do All Tattoo Pigments Use Mercury and Other Toxic Heavy Metals?: Scientific American

More reading;

"Are Tattoos Toxic? New Research Shows Endocrine Disruptors, Metals and Carcinogens in Tattoo Ink";

Are Tattoos Toxic? New Research Shows Endocrine Disruptors, Metals and Carcinogens in Tattoo Ink | Alternet

^

"Although sleazy "scratcher shops" with unskilled artists and dubious safety records are becoming a thing of the past, scientists are growing concerned about what's going into tattooed skin, not just how it got there.

New research has turned up troubling findings about toxic chemicals in tattoo inks, including some phthalates, metals, and hydrocarbons that are carcinogens and endocrine disruptors.

Tattoo ink trouble is nothing new. The inks, which are injected into skin with small needles, have caused allergic rashes, chronic skin reactions, infection and inflammation from sun exposure, said Elizabeth Tanzi, co-director of the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery in Washington, D.C.

Now a new study published in July suggests that phthalates and other chemical ingredients may be responsible for those problems.

More concerning, these newfound chemicals raise unanswered questions about more serious, long-term risks such as skin cancer."



Etc...

So yes. I'm sure you understand where my concerns are coming from here. I'm no chemist but i know for a certain how toxic things like mercury are. I do not like the thought of it or other toxic ingredients being injected under my skin for life.

In the limited time i have been on this forum, i have read a lot of threads on bad tattoo reactions like people experiencing tattoos that are not healing properly. In pretty much all of the cases i have seen people being told that they either have an "infection" or are experiencing an "allergic reaction" and are often told that it will "settle down" etc.

But how much of these bad reactions are down to allergies or infections? How many are instead down to the fact that people are having toxic substances injected under their skin?
If i spill acid on my skin, you do not tell me that i'm having an allergic reaction to acid, you say that i am having a reaction the chemical i just spilled on my skin. If my skin fails to heal around a ball of mercury but instead dies & becomes infected, you wouldn't say that my skin is failing to heal because i wasn't hygienic and failed to look after it properly, you say that no, it is because skin will struggle to heal around a toxic metal.

Has nobody considered that perhaps an awful lot more bad tattoo reactions/tricky healing processes are down to the ingredients of what people are injecting under their skin rather than mysterious "allergic reactions" or poor hygiene?
Is anyone else here concerned about tattoo ink ingredients?
Is anybody else here concerned about the long term effects of these ingredients?
Has anyone else wondered about other health problems or strange symptoms being connected to tattoos like "Mees' lines" ( Mees' lines - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ) etc?
I skipped reading most of this not because it isn't interesting which I am sure it is, I prefer not too read stuff that fills my head with negative shit. Too much thinking

I am pretty sure you could Google any product and find bad shit about it.

Not saying I am correct in thinking like this but I prefer burying my head in the sand and just doing, taking, eating whatever I like and not let the stresses and strains of thinking what could happen to me, for me it's a waste of time
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Old 08-06-2013, 01:56 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by peterpoose View Post
I skipped reading most of this not because it isn't interesting which I am sure it is, I prefer not too read stuff that fills my head with negative shit. Too much thinking

I am pretty sure you could Google any product and find bad shit about it.

Not saying I am correct in thinking like this but I prefer burying my head in the sand and just doing, taking, eating whatever I like and not let the stresses and strains of thinking what could happen to me, for me it's a waste of time
Lol my whole mind is one that overthinks- it's both a blessing and a curse. I wish I had your ostrich ability because once a question has even been raised I am beyond the point of being able to not think about it.

My take on the situation;

1. I am still tattoo-less but it has only been a short while since I begun my quest of seriously getting a tattoo. A minority people here have berated me for not diving into the decision sooner (as I'm 27) but all I can say is that I am glad I am doing research like this because if I already had tattoos and had only found out about these worries now I would be very worried myself about what exatly I had lying under my skin.

2. I have enough mental illness running in my family already to not be injecting mercury or lead into myself (ingredients which are known to mess with the mind). I would consider myself "pretty normal" but I'm also aware that things can run in the genes which lie in you like dormant seeds and only need the right things to germinate.

3. My skin is precious to me- probably more than most. It almost killed me when I was a kid (cancerous tumor), then later in my early to mid teens I was almost driven to suicide over acne problems. As an adult many people compliment me on my skin (the vampire palor which runs in my fathers side of the family which I inherited now seems increasingly appealing to people) but I suffer from sensitive skin and so I have to take very particular care of it etc. So I'm very aware of my skin and value it highly- I don't think you really start to appreciate having good skin until you have suffered over it.

4. Like everyone else I take risks and do things that are not good for my health. For example I smoke (a big irony concerning my concern for my skin I know) and consume foods & drinks with unhealthy ingredients (and even though I am slim I know I am not as physically active as I should be) etc. But I never hide my head in the sand about things if I can help it- I like to be informed about everything. Whether I make a healthy or unhealthy decision, I like it to be an informed one.
And this lack of information on tattoo ink ingredients and wealth of concerns on them concerns me greatly.

Last edited by Tokis-Phoenix; 08-06-2013 at 02:18 AM.
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Old 08-06-2013, 01:56 AM   #5
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im with peterpoose on that one. you only live once, do what you want, eat wehat you want, frink what you want. inject what you want under your skin (preferably not smack lol) you could get whacked by a bus tomorrow. but do people stop tkaing the bus? or crossing the road because of this chance? no. you like tattoos? get one. enjoy it while you can, your not gonna get another lifetime to try it
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Old 08-06-2013, 02:12 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by jimm123 View Post
im with peterpoose on that one. you only live once, do what you want, eat wehat you want, frink what you want. inject what you want under your skin (preferably not smack lol) you could get whacked by a bus tomorrow. but do people stop tkaing the bus? or crossing the road because of this chance? no. you like tattoos? get one. enjoy it while you can, your not gonna get another lifetime to try it
It seems there have been enough concerns in the industry for companies to start producing "non-toxic ingredient" tattoo inks. But on the other hand the safety of the inks being used in the industry doesn't seem to be an overall concern- some tattooists use natural inks but plenty use the worrying ones (and by the looks of it, plenty if top artists or reputable studios at that). Ironically there seems to be a lot more concern over the hygiene aspect of tattooing than the fundamental ingredient aspect of it.

Maybe I'm different, but I do not want to be a human guinea pig. Ignorance is not bliss for me. If I get tattooed, I want to know exactly what is in that ink. I want to know if the substances under my skin are toxic or not. If I take a risk, I want to be aware of that risk- you use the bus because you weigh up the risks, etc.

Before these concerns were raised, I just naturally assumed that the ink industry was transparent and well regulated- that dodgey ingredients would only make their way into dodgey tattoo studios, that well established artists would only used products well established in health, safety and performance. That people wouldn't be injecting substances that include mercury, lead & arsenic etc into the skin.
But it appears I was wrong in that assumption.

Last edited by Tokis-Phoenix; 08-06-2013 at 02:19 AM.
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Old 08-06-2013, 09:22 AM   #7
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you can get ed hardy stick on tattoos, they should be safe.
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Old 08-06-2013, 09:35 AM   #8
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I think nowadays everything is bad for you, things that were traditionally seen as good, scientists are discovering that it may be bad. We're in an age where everyone wants to sue someone for something. I agree with the above in that you could probably find that drinking too much water and eating too much fresh fruit will damage you, you go to the gym and get told that running is bad for your knees..... Everyone is always focused on how things are bad for you. I don't recall hearing about anyone's arm falling off after they got tattooed or their chest piece exploding in the middle of the night, I think it's a good quality to have to be cautious and do your research but I think if you dig deeper on anything there will be someone who will be saying its bad for you or your body.
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Old 08-06-2013, 09:40 AM   #9
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Isnt this more with older inks? I think things have moved on since.

And arnt there just as many "lethal" chemicals in cigarettes etc, but in such small doses its not really that harmful. Sucking on a car exhust will kill you, but walking on a path by a road wont.

Hell, maybe the small doses of poison will make as immune to larger doses?

Last edited by Mitze90; 08-06-2013 at 09:45 AM.
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Old 08-06-2013, 10:02 AM   #10
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Why don't you speak to your artist, or the one you are thinking of going too? Some artists keep the information about their inks since some recent issues about what's in them. For every bad thing you read there is a good thing speaking with the person you want to do your tattoo is always the best idea
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