Punctured Skin - Piercing Supplement (NSFW)

Published: 01 April, 2011 - Featured in Skin Deep 132, April, 2006

With piercing fast becoming one of the biggest trends of recent years and given the fact that it is not going to go away (no matter how much some circles of society would like it to) we thought it would be a good idea to publish an A-Z of the most popular piercings so when you go to get a piercing, (a) you will know what it’s called and (b) you will know the location on the body for where any particular piercing is. If we run this as an actual A-Z we would be darting around all over the body so we are going to start at the top and work our way down, so it’s not really an A-Z at all.

This dictionary will contain most of today’s recognized piercings, although there are some that have been excluded, such as “extreme” surface piercings where the placement and healing are not usually very successful, such as the webs of fingers, armpits, forehead etc.

We would like to stress that the placement of each individuals piercing will differ slightly according to the structure of the person’s anatomy, and that some people may not have the required anatomy to enable them to have the piercing that they desire.

The A-Z of Piercing

Please Note: This is only a guide to show the location of piercings; Not a learning guide of exact piercing placements.

 

Above The Neck

Eyebrow: The placement for eyebrow piercings is generally towards the end of the eyebrow, placed vertically just after the highest point. However the piercing can be almost anywhere through the Eyebrow, with some people opting for very diagonal piercings or multiple piercings.

 

Erl (Or Earl): The ‘Erl’ is a horizontal piercing through the skin over the bridge of the nose. It’s usually placed just above eye level but below the eyebrows.

 

Nostril: The placement of Nostril piercings can vary, but it is more commonly found at or near the end of the curved crease on the side of the nose.

 

Septum: The Septum piercing is a horizontal piercing through the thin piece of mucous-membrane inside the nose, towards the tip between the nostrils.

 

Nasalang: The Nasalang is actually three piercings in one; it goes horizontally through both nostrils and the septum.

 

Madonna/Monroe: This piercing gets its name from either of the singer’s or actress’s beauty spot, being located above the upper lip and to one side.

 

Philtrum: The philtrum is the anatomically correct name given to the piece of skin in the middle of the external surface of the upper lip, in the little shallow dip. This piercing can also come under the term of Labret.

 

Labret: A labret piercing can describe any piercing around the facial lips, but is usually describing the piercing placed below the bottom lip either in the middle or off to one side.

 

Frenulum: The location for the Frenulum piercing is through the thin web of mucous-membrane connecting the inner top lip to the gum.

 

Tongue Web: The tongue web piercing is found horizontally through the web of skin, which connects the underside of the tongue to the bottom palate of the mouth. 

 

Tongue: There are quite a few variations of the tongue piercing, the most common being placed approx 2.5cm from the tip through the middle of the tongue. It is also fairly common for people to have two tongue piercings, usually if someone has a large vein running down the middle of their tongue, they can alternatively have it pierced at each side.

 

Venom: The venom is another tongue piercing which is placed approx 2.5cm back from the tip of the tongue. The venom however is pierced diagonally so you end up with two top balls and two bars which both go into one ball underneath the tongue.

 

Cheek: The placement of cheek piercings can differ from being placed just slightly out from the corners of the mouth to actually being more into the cheek muscle, where they give the effect of dimples.

 

Madison: The Madison is the piercing located at the front of the neck, horizontally between, but slightly above the collarbones.

 

Nauche or Oversby: The Nauche or Oversby (the latter being named after the late Mr. Sabastion) is to be found at the back/nape of the neck, again this is a horizontal piercing.

 

Ear Piercings

Lobe: The best place to have the ear-lobe pierced is straight through the centre of the lobe.

 

Rim: A “Rim” piercing describes the piercing on the upper, outer edge of the ear, through the cartilage.

 

Tragus: The ‘Tragus’ piercing is through the little piece of cartilage where the ear joins the face, the best location being where these two meet.

 

Anti-Targus: The ‘Anti-Tragus’ is the other small piece of cartilage diagonally opposite (downwards) from the Tragus, just above the ear lobe.

 

Diath: The Diath is situated at the end of the ear rim: follow it all the way round until you are in the ear, the Diath is under/next to the Rook piercing and can be a good healer as it is protected from knocks and bumps.

 

Conch: The ‘Conch’ is the back of the ear (the shell); a ‘Conch’ piercing can be done either vertically or horizontally.

 

Rook: The ‘Rook’ is an inner ear piercing through the fold of cartilage (triangular fossa) opposite the Diath.

 

Scaffold/Industrial: Scaffold or Industrial ear piercing describes one piece of jewellery passing through two ear piercings (ie) Diath to Rim. There are endless variations of scaffolding, with many opting for more than one, creating a visually stunning effect.  

 

Nipple Piercings

Horizontal Nipple: Placement of nipple piercings can depend on whether the nipple belongs to a man or woman and on how developed the nipple is. This piercing is usually behind the nipple (not behind the areola) and is pierced horizontally.

 

Verticle Nipple: This is the same as above, except it is pierced vertically.

 

Note 1: Nipples can also be pierced diagonally, but this is not as common. Some people also opt for multiple nipple piercings, the most common having both a horizontal and vertical piercing.

 

Note 2: Nipple piercings have been found to help people who have inverted nipples, by them being pierced it stops the nipple from inverting and over a period of time the nipple/s tend to stay out on their own in a majority of cases.

 

Navel Piercings

Navel: This is probably the most popular of all body piercings. There are a few variations of navel piercings with the most common being through the top end of the navel. If this is not possible (which it isn’t in some cases) because of the navel shape, it could be placed at the bottom of the navel. Some people also opt for multiple navel piercings.

 

If you have what is commonly known as an “outy” belly button do not be tempted to have the actual belly button pierced, as this could be extremely dangerous.

 

Male Genital

Prince Albert: The Prince Albert is the most popular of all the male genital piercings. The actual piercing is made through the urethra, exiting behind the base of the penis head.

 

Ampallang: The Ampallang piercing passes through the penis head, through or slightly below the urethra (horizontally from left to right).

 

Reverse Prince Albert: The reverse Prince Albert is basically the same principle as the normal Prince Albert, the only difference being: instead of the piercing exiting behind the penis head, it exits through the front of the penis head.

 

Apadrvya: The Apadrvya is through the penis head, but unlike the Ampallang, which is from left to right, the Apadrvya is from front to back (the entry hole being in the same place as the exit hole of a reverse Prince Albert.)

 

Dyode: Another penis head piercing, the Dydoe passes horizontally through the side ridge (corona) of the head.

 

Frenum: The frenum is the piercing which is located behind the penis head, through the loose piece of skin.

 

Foreskin: The foreskin piercing is through the end of the foreskin, approximately 10-15mm from the end.

 

Pubic: The Pubic piercing is placed roughly where the pelvis joins the body or just slightly above.

 

Hafada: Hafadas are piercings of the scrotal sack; the best place from a healing point of view is through a fold of skin.

 

Guiche: The Guiche is a horizontal piercing, which is located between the end of the scrotal sack and the anus.

 

Female Genital

Vertical Clitoris Hood: This is one of the most popular of the female genital piercings. The piercing is placed vertically through the thin piece of flesh (the hood), which covers the clitoris.

 

Horizontal Clitoris Hood: This piercing is the same as above; the only difference being that the jewellery is placed horizontally instead of vertically.

 

Clitoris: This is the piercing of the actual clitoris, which can also be pierced both horizontally and vertically, but at the same time remembering that not every woman has the anatomy for this piercing to be successful.

 

Outer Labia: This is the piercing of the outer, larger vaginal lips. These can be pierced anywhere along their length.

 

Inner Labia: This is the piercing of the thinner inner lips of the vagina.

 

Christina: The Christina is a semi surface piercing that is vertical and runs from the top of the vagina up the pelvis. This piercing is normally between 3 and 5 cm in length.

 

The following female genital piercings are not very common but are recognised piercings.

 

Triangle: The Triangle is the piercing, which can be found under/behind the clitoris/clitoris hood horizontally. It is through where the hood, mons veneris and labia meet. This piercing must only be performed by a skilled piercer, as misplacement is common.

 

Fourchette: The Fourchette is the small pocket at the base of the vagina. The Fourchette could be described as the female equivalent to the male Guiche. This piercing is found at the base of the vagina and is not recommended if you have a lot of penetrative sex.

 

Princess Albertina: The female equivalent to the ‘Prince Albert’. This urethral piercing is through the urethral opening and exits approximately 10mm underneath.

 

Isabella: The Isabella is a vertical piercing. The entry point being the base of the clitoris, the exit point being the top of the clitoris hood, so the piercing is usually about 30mm in length, going behind the clitoris and hood. 

 

 

An Interview with Psycho Cyborgs

‘Psycho Cyborgs’ was premiered at Torture Garden on 10th December 2005. Though uncompromising and extreme, even by TG standards, there is more to this show than the usual freak show fare of blood, guts and sideshow illusion. I spoke to Samppa Von Cyborg and Baawo Bee, its creators, in order to discover more about its concept and creation as well as their views on the world in general.

So, when was it that you first became interested in body modification and what was the first work that you had done?

Samppa: "I was around the age of 10 when I first came across a tattoo studio that was in Copenhagen and it sparked my interest. When I was 12, I made my first tattoo, having discovered a method to insert ink under the skin. That tattoo, which consisted of a heart with an arrow through the middle, wasn’t that successful and has since been covered, but at least I got the ink in. At that time, in Finland, there were very few people with tattoos, so this was a real novelty for me. When I was 13, I had my first ear piercing and, on my 18th birthday, had my first real tattoo. Over the years I met many good tattoo artists at conventions and the work on my body became more extensive. At that time I realised that I did not want to become a tattooist but took up the offer from a Finnish artist to teach me to pierce. Ironically, I had really been more interested in tattoos, but after about a month of becoming involved with piercing, this became my passion. So really things just developed gradually."

Baawo: "My first piercing was done at the age of 13, that was my Tragus piercing. Things were really difficult for me as my parents have always been against that kind of thing and that’s probably the reason why I didn’t attempt to get any tattoos until I was 18. However, since that time, I’m 25 now, things have been a little bit rushed. Nowadays my parents are more accepting, my father says, ‘do what you like but don’t kill yourself with what you are doing’."

Who, or what, were your influences at the time?

Baawo: "When I first saw Enigma on TV, I thought that was just my thing, I decided then that I wanted to be something other than the way I had been created, basically I had a vision of how I wanted to become."

Samppa: "I’m really influenced by futuristic ideas and by cyborgs and that is reflected in the modification work that I do. But of course many things can influence body modification past, present and future, my work could be described as representing a meeting point between history and the future. In terms of the development of my own body art, one day I intend to have a tattoo covering half of my face but I don’t want any kind of traditional tribal design, such as Moko, as we know it. Instead I have a vision to develop my own cyborg, futuristic, tribal Moko, incorporating circuit boards, so basically if you see me from afar it would look like a tribal design but on closer inspection a more three dimensional futuristic design is revealed. My work was initially influenced by Steve Haworth, as it was he who invented a lot of the modificatory procedures that I now practice and I do believe that if it hadn’t been for Steve, I would probably never have ended up doing body modification at all. Other than that I don’t really have any heroes, I’m now doing everything my own way, I rarely adopt the tried and tested methods favoured by other practitioners, but prefer to discover new and innovative ways of achieving the desired result. But there are people whose work I respect, namely Steve Haworth, Ryan Ouelette and Lukas Zpira. Ryan is, in my opinion, the best scarification artist around, it was he who first realised that scarification can be like a tattoo, not just straight lines, he mixed lots of techniques together and came up within his own style which is very individual. Before Ryan, there was Lukas, and he is a really good friend of mine, but he is more old school in terms of his work. There is probably one other person who is influential in the body mod industry and that is Jesse Jarrell."

So you’ve told me about the influences relating to your body modification practice but what are the influences regarding your performance work?

Samppa: "I can’t really say that anyone in particular has influenced that. For example, when I came up with the concept for the Psycho Cyborg show, I was in prison, so I couldn’t really get any influences from the outside, so all of the ideas came from my sick mind. However, when I saw the Suka Off show for the first time, I was aware that they had created a similar mood and atmosphere to our show, but they didn’t influence the creation of our show. I suppose comic books, paintings, music, science, and all sorts of different art forms influence my performance work."

So how did you two begin working together?

Baawo: "When Samppa did my head implants he mentioned that he was moving to London and told me that I was welcome to come and stay with him, so I came over and did a private suspension and after that he suggested we do a show together. In Finland I performed with Sirkus Tapaturma, (tapaturma translates as accident), which we started in 2001, we did many different shows often involving up to 14 people, it was more like a hardcore freak show with lots of blood, we only disbanded when I moved to London about six months ago. I suppose I’m now trying to create myself as a comic book hero, a sort of animal hero, hence the name, Baawo Bee."

What was the theme for the Psycho Cyborg show and how did it come about?

Samppa: "When I was in Dublin I did some body mod work for Preacher, we later became friends, and when we both ended up in London it seemed an obvious move to involve him in some of the ideas I had been developing as he was already doing a lot of performance work based on freak shows. Then Baawo moved here too, and it’s really Baawo and myself who are the Psycho Cyborgs, but we have a team of people with whom we collaborate."

So for people looking at these photos, who may not have seen the show, how would you summarize it for them? 

Samppa: "You could get the same mood if you watched a Hellraiser movie and put on some dark, noise music, and, at the same time, hurt yourself badly. This show is not like a normal sideshow, it’s more theatrical, we use background videos, music, costume, and it’s a whole package, a big production."

There is obviously a lot of preparation needed to orchestrate a show like this!

Samppa: "Yes, but we always leave everything until the last few days and then at the last minute we realise we don’t have half the stuff we need."

Baawo: "The main problem is that although we know exactly what we need for a show, we are from Finland, and things work differently here in London. In Helsinki, you can do everything in one day, here it takes a day just to get around B&Q."

Samppa: "Luckily now, for the Psycho Cyborg show, we have everything we need."

And how about mental preparation?

Baawo: "Before a show I’m always nervous, even though I’ve done so many shows, but once the show gets going, I really concentrate on what’s happening, I know exactly what I’m doing and there’s a performance rush!"

What is it about endeavouring to transform the body, working with blood, flesh, silicone, steel and other materials, that appeals to you?

Baawo: "For me, it just feels natural."

Samppa: "The things that we do in our shows are just what I want to see. You saw my show a few years ago at TG, that was just a hardcore show, it didn’t really have a point. Nowadays it doesn’t matter if we bleed a lot, after all anyone can bleed, our shows are now more theatrical, whereas most contemporary sideshows merely recreate tricks from traditional freak shows. With this show for instance we originally intended to use a staple gun to attach the circuit boards, but after a while I decided that was too boring, every freak show uses staple guns, so I tried the power drill and when they use needles for play piercings, we use a drill bit."

A lot of people watching your show might imagine that you all like pain. I know that’s not necessarily the case, so how do you see it, work with it, manage it?

Samppa: "I think you can only enjoy pain if you are a masochist. I’m definitely not, I hate pain but I like to be in control of it. So many people ask me if I’m into S&M, and it’s really not my thing, yes I can play around with it for fun but that’s about it. Its like if you are working in a petrol station and some girl asks you to stick the petrol pump in her pussy, you really don’t want to do that as you’re using that pump every day as part of your work, so you no longer see it as fun."

I think that in our present culture we are always led to regard pain as a negative feeling, you transform it into something positive?     

Samppa: "Pain can be fun and can be a really helpful tool, both mentally and physically. For instance, if you try and prepare for a suspension with meditation and yoga, it could take fucking years to get to the stage where your body and mind work in perfect harmony to achieve that balance enabling you to mange the pain. For me, the reverse is true, pain is the most powerful feeling you can get, and when you start feeling pain, it makes your body and mind work together, and after a few suspensions you realise that you can control not only pain, but any other feelings as well. And when you can overcome all of your fears, it makes you so much stronger.

And nowadays, I really push things. When I was young I used to think that any pain was horrible, now I don’t whine anymore, I just work with the feeling."

How about accidents?

Samppa: "I never do a show unless I know exactly what I’m doing. But there are obviously aspects of the shows, which can result in some damage. For example, when attaching the circuit boards, we couldn’t use screws smaller than 12mm long and with the power and velocity of the drill they go through muscle and in some cases, into bone."

Baawo: "In the last show when I went to rip off the first circuit board it came away fairly easily, I then went for the other one, which was so deeply imbedded in the bone that the screw actually came away from the board when I was tugging it."

Are you at all aware of the audience when you are performing?

Baawo: "Not really, we have to focus. If I’m using a drill on Samppa and loose my concentration for even a second, I could go through his arm."

Samppa: "Of course we notice them but we ignore them."

Do audiences in different countries vary in their response to your shows?

Samppa: "Its difficult to say because in England we generally perform in fetish clubs whereas the last show I did in Finland was at a rock concert with an audience comprising of 15-18 year old kids."

Baawo: "I’ve done lots of shows at weddings and lots of shows in fetish clubs in Finland but there an audience is much more silent, whereas in London you immediately know whether an audience likes you or not. I’ve performed in some cities in Finland where the audience is completely silent you don’t hear anything."

Tell us something about the microchip implant you both have in your wrist.

Samppa: "It’s a kind of cyborg link between us and Lukas Zpira, we all have the same. It could be used to open doors, in theory you could use it like an oyster card, top up, swipe card, it could have many applications, you could personalise it to protect your laptop."

Given your appearance, what kind of reactions do you get in everyday life?

Baawo: "That really depends on where we are. For example, in Finland there are not so many freaks as here in London, so people are not so sure how to cope with us, they tend to stare but rarely ask questions."

Samppa: "Things are much easier for us there, people just stare, in London they always ask questions, they all want to now what’s going on with us so we are constantly being stopped and questioned."

So how do you see the future in terms of your performance?

Samppa: "I’d hope that we could become as famous as some bands, we’d like to have the same kind of fan base, have the same kind of status. I’d like Psycho Cyborg to become like a brand name."

Baawo: "In Finland we had fans that used to come to all of our shows, wear our t-shirts, which was really fun." 

Is there anything else you would like to tell us?

Baawo: "At the moment I’m writing a short movie, it includes some Cyborg themes as well. Samppa stars a Dr Von Cyborg, it is he who creates the monster."

Samppa: "In the future, I’d like to be known as a visual artist rather than as a body modification practitioner, I want to work with digital art, doing a combination of art forms, bringing that work to a gallery context. Basically, I can produce work digitally from my laptop whilst laying in my bed without moving out of the house."

Baawo: "Cos he’s a lazy bastard! My ambition would be to survive financially purely from my stage shows."

 

 

Holier Than Thou, Manchester

Piercing and body modifications have enjoyed a huge upsurge in popularity over the last decade with many people going for more and more extreme forms of piercing and body mods. A while back it was almost unheard of anyone having their tongue split or being branded except for a small group of ‘underground’ people. Nowadays, these processes are becoming more commonplace. With the interest in body modifications, there are a handful of specialist piercing studios offering these practices and are also pushing the boundaries as to what modifications can be offered to the public.

One such studio is Holier Than Thou. Nestled pretty much in the heart of Manchester, Graham and his crew offer many ‘Advanced’ modifications in one of the most hygienic and sterile studios I’ve had the pleasure of visiting. So if you want your ears piercing or would like to have your tongue spilt, Holier Than Thou can offer all of these techniques and everything in between.

When did you start getting an interest in body mods?

"I started when I was seventeen. I was pissed off with the world and I thought to myself that nobody is going to employ me with this attitude. And I just started experimenting with some body mods and I read an awful lot about what was out there in this line of work. It was about this time I discovered the book ‘Modern Primitives’."

Was this a good or bad thing?

"On reflection it was a bad thing as I found many of the subjects covered weren’t researched very well. So after reading this book, I started experimenting on myself and friends who were willing at the time. I had a friend who was a medical student, so I had access to Edinburgh University medical library, which was very useful. I also met a lot of doctors and I learnt a lot by asking questions. At the time there was someone who was butchering/piercing people and I could see what he was doing wrong so I learnt a lot by watching his mistakes. So I got a couple of friends around and tried a couple of things on them, just to see if I could do it on other people. I could do all these processes on myself but I’d not tried them on other folk. And by the time I was twenty, I as working with Spacey in his studio.

Things fell apart personally and I ended up working in Coalition body piercing in Edinburgh a couple of years later. By this time I had learnt so much. It’s different when you have time to do things at your own pace but when you are running it as a business, boy, things change dramatically! It was time to move on as I had just about enough of the bitchiness and underhandedness in the piercing industry. If you thought Tattooists could be a bit bitchy, it’s nothing compared with body piercers I can tell you!"

So what do you do next?

"I gave body piercing a break and started studying to become a furniture maker and ended up in Manchester to do my degree. To make ends meet, I started working at Manchester piercing part-time, things progressed and I ended up working full-time running the head shop/smoking side of the business, which the owner eventually sold to me. And I was supposed to buy the whole building but there was a lot of debt going with the building. I thought ‘things are going to fold here soon.’ So started up my own studio and three weeks later, they closed Manchester Piercing down. The owner did a lot for piercing in the early days but she also left quite a bit of outstanding debts behind her."

And you opened up your piercing studio. How did things progress?

"I’ve always been interested in pushing boundaries and trying new things. I mean I was experimenting with surface bars ten years ago. At that time it as a brand new science as it were. And now I’m moving more into modification and so on. Apart from one other person we are the only studio that can offer certification with our silicone implants. The company that produces the pieces for me will provide an identification number so each one can be tracked to a certain time and company. These inserts are now being sold all over the world. I’m also working on disposable shaped dermal punches at the moment."

Do you find that people are coming to you now for more extreme types of body mods and piercing than say, three years ago?

"Piercing is almost bread and butter money now as we are doing more extreme work everyday, form Dermal punching to sub dermal implants to tongue splitting as well as other mods. We have our surgical PTFE bars made in a clean room so everything is completely sterile. There are other guys doing this sort of thing but not many. I like the work of Lukas Zapira and his cuttings, which look amazing. But what you have to remember is that people’s bodies are all different and some may keloid (Scar) better than others.

Kate one of our receptionists has some cutting/scaring done on her chest. This was done in someone’s house. If you are going to be modern, you need to be professional, sterile and very serious about the procedures involved. You also need good premises with clean wipe-down surfaces."

Do you have problems with the local Health Authority?

"Somebody got a bit pissed off with us for opening up and called the EHO. They came out and the woman was great. We thought she might have some concerns over us branding but she said, you do it safely, you do it cleanly, it’s better you do it here in a clean environment than someone doing it from a back room. We’re currently in the process of trying to get official approval for doing this. They know we do it and they have seen the after care procedures and so on. When they gave us permission for the shop they said at the time we know you do these techniques, just don’t be silly. When we find the time we’re going to get the EHO’s out to discuss the registration. We want to raise the bar a bit for body mods. As it is anybody can become a body piercer and we want to help bring the hygiene aspects into all forms of body modification.

You can never be too clean."

Who works in your shop?

"We have Carina who works part-time in front of shop, Kate, who is my apprentice and works out front on reception, Cat who helps out around the studio and Marcus, the other piercer. Marcus is a star; you’ll not find a nicer guy to work with he is so friendly and laid back it’s not true. He’ll do anything for anybody. He got most of his training from working in Manchester Piercing but I also bring in some people who have a lot more experience than me to help train him up. I mean, I’ve got thirteen years experience but there’s breaks in that time. And I think it’s fairer that someone who has been doing this sort of work for longer can impart some of his or her knowledge onto all of us. 

I think it’s the best way to get the best results. I really do feel that we are the most professional piercing studio in the Northwest bar none. Reputation is so hard to get but very easy to lose. We have built the studio up from nothing. It’s a rolling thing, you don’t have the money to start with but as things progress you invest back into the business and hopefully improve the studio, our techniques and so on as you go along. All our jewellery and equipment is scrupulously cleaned in an ultrasonic bath then through the Autoclave and dated. If it hasn’t been used within a certain period it goes through the whole cleaning process all over again."

What do you do when you aren’t at the studio?

"I’m at Uni at the moment finishing off my final year of my degree in furniture making. I’m developing implants and so on. It sort of ‘furniture for the body’. Don’t think tables and chairs; think a bit further than that. I have just set up another company not related to body piercing and I hope to start some other business ventures soon. 

I’m hoping to produce a new type of suspension hook and some new dermal punches in the future, so I’ve always got some thing on the go!"

In your early days, was there anyone that you looked up to or that influenced you to take the path you have?

"When I was very young I use to watch the Mustafa’s and about eight years ago Shannon from BME came on the scene and what a nice guy he is. The guy that most influences what I’m doing Is Steve Howarth. He is a pioneer in body mod field. He makes mistakes like everybody else does but his mistakes tend to be ground breaking. He learns very quickly too. I think Steve will always be that one step ahead of everybody."

What would you say is the most asked for body mod at the moment?

"Tongue splitting. Also the inside of the lip, which is the new navel piercing. It is very popular at the moment. Years ago it was navels, then eyebrows, and then tongues now, inside lips."

Can you explain a little about your branding procedures?

"We use two types of branding; one type is Strike branding, where we make a shape out of stainless steel, then this is heated and pressed onto the skin. This is the old fashioned way and we do Cautery pen branding. We are also looking into diathermic branding where the body is earthed and the unit draws an electrical current and burns the skin that way."

Have you got any other plans for the studio at all?

"We have plans to get a freak show up and running then this year we will concentrate on working as many conventions as we can. We will be piercing at the Porththcawl convention in South Wales, which we are really looking forward to. We’re doing Cardiff as well."

Is there anyone that you would like to thanks for helping you along the way?

"It would have been nice to have had some help over the years! Seriously, I have a lot of friends and you know who you are. The one person I really want to thank is Marcus, he’s a real gem and he’s worked his arse off for the studio and me. I just can’t thank him enough."

 

Holier Than Thou are open 7 days a week.

105a Oldham Street,
Manchester.
M4 1LW 
Tel: 0161 8393737
www.holier-than-thou.co.uk

Credits

Text: Paul Callaby & Ashley; Photography: Paul Callaby & Ashley

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