Old 16-04-2018, 02:10 PM   #11
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are we really? i think being new in really well done tattooing is subjective to the genre. it applies to hyper realism but certainly not traditional or japanese style of tattooing. when you see 40-50-60 year old body suits hold up well, i don’t think we can really classify that as “relatively new”
Yeah I think there's a difference between well done, as in applied correctly, and well done as in visually pleasing. A lot of artists have gotten application down a while ago, so I def think there are a lot of tattoos from back then that do hold up, like the body suits you are talking about
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Old 16-04-2018, 02:22 PM   #12
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Yeah I think there's a difference between well done, as in applied correctly, and well done as in visually pleasing. A lot of artists have gotten application down a while ago, so I def think there are a lot of tattoos from back then that do hold up, like the body shots you are talking about
fair point, however i do think that also applies to japanese style. it’s not hard to find incredible work from the past that is both aesthetically pleasing and holds up well. horiyoshi 1 & 2, horibun, horiuno 1 & 2, horigoro,horihide(my personal fave), horikin and horicho all have work that are decades old and are still beautiful today.

eddy deutsche has work from 25 years ago that are still very good tattoos by today’s standards.
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Old 16-04-2018, 03:19 PM   #13
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I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with anyone, just passing on anecdotal information:

A couple of different artists have told me that there has been a huge jump in the quality of the equipment and supplies from the 1990s to today. The machines and needles are a lot more consistent and the quality of the ink is much better. They expect tattoos to stand the test of time way better than they did in the past.

That doesn't mean there haven't been artists working magic with old technology for a very long time.
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Old 16-04-2018, 04:24 PM   #14
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fair point, however i do think that also applies to japanese style. itís not hard to find incredible work from the past that is both aesthetically pleasing and holds up well. horiyoshi 1 & 2, horibun, horiuno 1 & 2, horigoro,horihide(my personal fave), horikin and horicho all have work that are decades old and are still beautiful today.

eddy deutsche has work from 25 years ago that are still very good tattoos by todayís standards.
For the record, I was agreeing with you. I definitely think artists have been able to apply tattoos well for a while now, it just heavily depends on the style.

I also think that machines/ink have improved insanely over the past few decades so that probably does help nowadays. That being said, tebori is still heavily used and heals well so old technology is still pretty good. Either way I think aging isn't really an issue if you go to a solid artist. If they apply it well, it should hold.
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Old 16-04-2018, 09:11 PM   #15
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The main thing I worry about isn't so much how they will age, but how much better artists will be in the future and it makes me think I should save my back and remaining free arm till last. If you look at some artists who were considered absolutely mind blowing from 10/15 years ago , some of them look so mediocre now. Especially in the last five years it seems the technicality has come on leaps and bounds. Who knows how much better they could be in 5 years?
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Old 16-04-2018, 09:35 PM   #16
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I exfoliate every month or so with an exfoliation glove and then cream after.

Regularly moisturize and baby them and you can't really go far wrong.

A good artist can always rework and brighten them up aswell if the did degrade over years aswell.

I am bad for not staying out of the sun though and I go very dark but if I tan I wear socks over most of them to protect them.
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Old 17-04-2018, 01:21 AM   #17
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I exfoliate every month or so with an exfoliation glove and then cream after.

Regularly moisturize and baby them and you can't really go far wrong.

A good artist can always rework and brighten them up aswell if the did degrade over years aswell.

I am bad for not staying out of the sun though and I go very dark but if I tan I wear socks over most of them to protect them.
I actually just got a exfoliating brush yesterday.
What lotion do you use?
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Old 17-04-2018, 02:12 PM   #18
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The main thing I worry about isn't so much how they will age, but how much better artists will be in the future and it makes me think I should save my back and remaining free arm till last. If you look at some artists who were considered absolutely mind blowing from 10/15 years ago , some of them look so mediocre now. Especially in the last five years it seems the technicality has come on leaps and bounds. Who knows how much better they could be in 5 years?
Yeah but nowadays with Instagram you are more plugged in then ever before. Back in the day you had to find artists by word of mouth or by magazine. This meant that not everyone saw the really hard to find, yet really good, artists.

10/15 years ago we didn't have so many styles, but now there's one for every form of art basically. I really don't think we will see another tattoo Renaissance, so I don't think most people should worry about going to get their back done. Plus your skin is better the younger you are, holding off 5-10 years might affect what you can get on your back depending on your age.
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Old 17-04-2018, 02:25 PM   #19
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Yeah, but the older you are when you get your back done, the better it'll look when you're 50.
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Old 17-04-2018, 04:05 PM   #20
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Yeah, but the older you are when you get your back done, the better it'll look when you're 50.
What if you are a 48-year old man who has leathery skin?
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